The Lundbeck Foundation tests the temperature of the Danish neuroscience environments

“We put the brain first.”

This is the title of the Lundbeck Foundation’s new strategy for charitable activities. One of the objectives of the strategy is to elevate Denmark to the ranks of the world’s leading brain research nations, and it is against this background that the Foundation aims to increase its grants to the field of neuroscience over the coming years.

To do this on an informed basis, the Lundbeck Foundation asked two of the most prominent scientists in the field to test the temperature of Danish neuroscience and write a report based on their observations and analyses.

Together with Martin Rossor, Emeritus Professor of Clinical Neurology, University College London, Sir Colin Blakemore, Professor of Neuroscience and Philosophy at the University of London and Emeritus Professor of Neuroscience, University of Oxford, visited the leading neuroscience environments at the Danish universities and university hospitals.

“If we’re to achieve this extremely ambitious goal of elevating Denmark to the ranks of the world’s leading brain research nations, we need to take a focused approach and concentrate on the right areas. Sir Colin Blakemore and Martin Rossor’s report gives us excellent insight into where we can make the biggest difference with our increased grants,” says Kim Krogsgaard, Managing Director of The Brain Prize at the Lundbeck Foundation.

Denmark lacks neuroscience degree programmes
Among other things, Sir Colin Blakemore and Martin Rossor observed that the breadth and quality of neuroscience research in Denmark is impressive and internationally competitive in many areas. Productivity levels are high and Denmark is successful in attracting leading scientists from abroad.

However, the two professors call for a Danish neuroscience Masters programme.

You can read more about Sir Colin Blakemore and Martin Rossor’s work and conclusions here